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When Should You Get a Total Knee Replacement?

If you are currently plagued by severely painful knee arthritis or injury, you are not alone. Knee problems are a fairly common condition experienced by people of all ages. Its symptoms may vary in degree and severity, but one thing’s for sure一it can definitely affect your mobility and decrease your quality of life.

Fortunately, there’s a treatment option that can save your knees and help you get back to your active lifestyle一a surgical technique called total knee replacement.

Are you considering this type of procedure? Read on below to learn more about total knee replacement: what it is, how it’s done, and when you should get it.

What is total knee replacement?

Total knee replacement or knee arthroplasty refers to a surgical procedure used to treat moderate to severely damaged knee joints. It involves removing the diseased knee boned and cartilage and then replacing them with artificial implants. 

This procedure is also known as knee “resurfacing” since the process only involves removing and replacing the surface portion of the knee joint.

The main goal of knee arthroplasty is to relieve knee pain and other symptoms by replacing the damaged knee parts with their artificial counterparts. 

When does a doctor recommend knee replacement surgery?

Doctors and orthopedic specialists usually perform total knee replacements to treat knee pain and disability. One of the most common causes of such symptoms is degenerative joint diseases, like osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis. 

During its early stages, arthritic conditions can be managed using conservative methods, like medications and physical therapy. However, your physician will recommend a knee replacement surgery when:

  • Non-surgical techniques do not work or improve the patient’s condition anymore. This includes prescription drugs, injections, and physical therapy.
  • There’s severe pain in the knees that causes mobility problems, limiting the patient from doing their daily living activities.
  • There’s moderate to severe pain and inflammation in the knees even when the patient is at rest, either day or night.
  • Knee deformity can be seen in the affected joints.

Furthermore, your orthopedic surgeon will conduct a full assessment of your joint condition first before surgery. A physical exam will help determine your knee’s limited range of motion, flexibility, and strength. Additionally, an x-ray or CT scan imaging can identify the extent of the joint’s damage, thus helping your surgeon decide what kind of surgical technique is appropriate.

How is it performed?

Knee replacement surgeries require patients to be put under spinal or general anesthesia. Your doctor will discuss this with you before your operation. Generally, here’s what happens during a total knee replacement procedure:

  • Your orthopedic surgeon will make an incision to expose the full surface of the affected knee joint. The damaged cartilage at the end of the tibia and femur will be removed. Your doctor will also take out the impaired bones underneath the cartilages.
  • Next, your surgeon will position the metal implants on the surface of the knee joint to cement it in place. Your doctor will discuss the best type of artificial joint that suits your medical needs.
  • The surgeon may also insert a spacer in between the metal prosthesis to ensure a smooth gliding surface of the artificial joint. 
  • Once everything is in place, the incision will be closed with stitches and topped with a sterile bandage.

Typically, doctors attach three prosthetic components to their patient during a total knee replacement: the tibial (shinbone), femoral (thigh bone), and patellar component.

How long does it take to recover from a total knee replacement?

Right after the surgery, it’s normal to feel pain, as this is a part of the healing process. Your doctor will prescribe you medications for pain management and infection. You will also be instructed about proper wound care, diet, breathing exercises, and activity restrictions.

Additionally, you’ll be advised to move your foot and ankle to avoid blood clots and reduce leg swelling. A physical therapist will also work with you during your recovery to help you regain leg movements and improve your healing process.

Recovery from a total knee replacement surgery will take three to six weeks. By this time, you can resume most of your day-to-day activities, such as walking and shopping. Remember to talk to your doctor first about your specific activity limitations. 

How long do you stay in the hospital for a total knee replacement?

How long you stay in the hospital or orthopedic surgery center depends on your individual medical needs. But most patients can go home the same day, a few hours after the operation. However, it’s essential to have someone with you to drive you home and assist you with personal tasks for the first few days. 

What is the most commonly reported problem after knee replacement surgery?

Complications rarely happen for patients who don’t have an underlying medical condition. In fact, severe problems like knee joint infection only occur in less than 2% of patients who undergo knee joint replacement. Although uncommon, here are some risks that you should be aware of:

  • Infection in the wound area or around the prosthesis.
  • Bleeding during the surgery
  • Blood clots
  • Nerves or blood vessel injury during the operation

This study delves deeper into some of the other complications patients might encounter after a knee replacement surgery.

There’s nothing to worry though, since your orthopedic specialist will give a thorough medical evaluation to ensure a safe and successful operation.

outpatient surgery center in Cary

Get the best orthopedic care at Panther Creek UNC.

At Panther Creek’s outpatient surgery center in Cary, we provide the highest quality of patient care and services to treat your musculoskeletal conditions. Our board-certified team of orthopedic specialists ensures that each patient gets an individualized plan of care tailored to address their medical needs. 

Take back your pain-free life by getting in touch with us! Contact our team to learn more about total knee replacement and other orthopedic procedures that we offer. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Injuries to the elbow can be especially troublesome. The elbow is required for many daily tasks, such as getting dressed. Disruption in the functioning of the elbow can impact our ability to drive or perform at work. When you experience pain or mobility issues, your daily life can be significantly impacted. 

The elbow is a large and complicated joint. Injury or disease to the bones, ligaments, or muscles that support the elbow can cause debilitating symptoms. Orthopedic physicians can best assist with diagnosis and treatment because of their knowledge of this complicated joint. 

Which Orthopedic Conditions Require Elbow Surgery?

There are many causes of orthopedic conditions in the elbow. Through proper diagnosis, orthopedic physicians and surgeons can best treat the root cause of your elbow pain. 

Elbow Bursitis

Elbow (olecranon) bursitis is inflammation in the part of the elbow called the bursae. Bursae are tiny, fluid-filled sacs that cushion the joint's bones, tendons, and muscles. The inflammation of these sacs causes elbow bursitis. 

Surgery is not always required, and in many cases, you can manage elbow bursitis with conservative treatments. However, in severe cases, an orthopedic surgeon needs to drain the sac or even remove it in rare cases. 

Most often, surgery is minimally invasive and performed arthroscopically. It is usually performed at outpatient surgical centers with high success rates. Surgeons make small incisions where a small camera and tiny instruments are used to perform the repair. 

Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow occurs when the tendons of the elbow become strained. It is called tennis elbow because it is most often seen in patients who use repetitive wrist and arm motions. It is not exclusive to tennis players and athletes. Many people in certain occupations also can have the condition if their arms are used repetitively for required tasks. 

Tennis elbow also is treated with conservative treatments before surgery, such as over the counter Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen or Advil, rest and ice, and physical therapy. When these efforts fail, surgery may be considered. 

Surgery involves:

  • Cutting the affected tendon;
  • Removing inflamed tissue around the tendon;
  • Occasionally reattaching tendons to nearby tissues.

The surgery can also be completed arthroscopically at an outpatient facility. In rare cases, the surgeon performs an open surgery. 

Rheumatoid Arthritis 

Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common causes of inflammation and pain in the elbow. It is an autoimmune disorder. The body's immune system attacks itself, breaking down the cartilage and affecting tissue around the joint. It can cause both painful joints and swelling. 

There are several conservative treatment options, including medication, physical therapy, and steroid injections. If it has progressed past the point where conventional methods no longer are helping, then surgical options are available. 

Surgery is often performed at outpatient surgical centers. Patients have successful results, often restoring mobility and eliminating pain in the joint once healed. 

Orthopedic Surgery Center Panther Creek

At Orthopedic Surgery Center Panther Creek We Provide the Exceptional Care You Deserve

Our surgery center is a partnership between Raleigh Orthopaedic clinic, UNC Rex, and Panther Creek UNC health. Our mission is to be North Carolina's premier orthopedic destination by providing exceptional care that is personalized and cost-effective. 

Orthopaedic Surgery Center of Panther Creek has an experienced team of board-certified fellowship-trained surgeons committed to safe results. Our patients can return to their active and healthy life through individualized treatment and education. 

Our outpatient surgical center located in Panther Creek is the most modern facility in East North Carolina. Why should you choose us? 

  • We care about you and your treatment
  • We offer world-class services
  • We use the most modern equipment at our surgical center
  • We are dedicated to being with you every step of the way

Contact us if you require orthopedic care and get started on your journey to healing.

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Your hips consist of a ball and socket joint that mainly provides stability and function to the body. It has a cup-like structure called the acetabulum, which stabilizes the femur (thighbone) together with a network of surrounding muscles and ligaments. 

This structure helps the hip joints bear the weight of your entire upper body while facilitating flexibility and mobility. So you can imagine why trauma and injuries in the pelvic area, like a dislocation, are deemed an emergency, requiring immediate medical assistance.

Source: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/globalassets/figures/a00352f01.jpg 

Read on below to know more about hip dislocation, its symptoms, leading causes, and what to do during such situations. 

What is hip dislocation?

A hip dislocation happens when the femur’s head gets pushed out of the pelvis (acetabulum) socket. As a result of this abnormal displacement, pelvic tissues and bones may also attain some damages, such as fractures and tears in the soft tissues. Additionally, nearby muscles, nerves, and blood vessels may also get impaired depending on the cause and severity of the injury.

A dislocated hip can occur due to several reasons, namely:

Additionally, dislocation may also happen in the first few months after a hip replacement surgery.

What are the types of hip dislocation?

Hip dislocation injuries may be classified as simple if there are no associated fractures and complex if it involves bone fractures in the acetabulum or femur. 

Another classification of hip joint displacements depends on the direction of the dislocated thigh bone or femur head. It can either be anterior or posterior dislocation.

Posterior Dislocation

This type of misplacement happens when the femur or thigh bone slips out of the pelvic bone backward or posteriorly. This occurs in 90% of reported hip dislocations and usually involves sciatic nerve injuries and thigh bone fractures.

Anterior Dislocation

On the other hand, anterior dislocations in the pelvic area involve the femur’s head getting pushed out of the socket in a forward direction. This type of displacement rarely happens since the anterior ligaments (iliofemoral) are much stronger than the posterior ones. 

What are the symptoms of hip dislocation?

As soon as your hips get dislocated, you will immediately feel a severe kind of pain in the pelvic area. Sometimes, this pain may even radiate onto the knees as some muscles in the thigh directly connect to it. Some of the other symptoms usually felt by patients during a dislocated hip include:

  • Inability to move or bear weight onto the affected leg.
  • Reduced range of motion
  • Swelling
  • Deformity in the leg (e.g., protruding femur head)
  • Numbness and weakness if the sciatic nerve is damaged.

What to do if you have a dislocated hip?

Hip dislocations should be treated as an emergency situation. So during such times, you should not move the injured pelvic area and call for medical assistance at once. An orthopedic specialist will then conduct a physical examination of the affected area. Usually, they can already confirm a case of hip dislocation just by looking at it.

However, they may also order specific imaging tests to see if there are other injuries involved or to see the direction of the displacement. Some examples of diagnostic tests include:

  • X-ray scanning
  • CT scan
  • MRI or magnetic resonance imaging - used only if there are damages in the labrum and surrounding cartilages.

How to treat hip dislocation?

Doctors should treat dislocated hips immediately to avoid further damage to the surrounding nerves or blood vessels. Physicians follow two approaches in fixing hip dislocation:

Nonsurgical Treatment

Most hip displacements can be fixed using nonsurgical techniques, like doing a closed reduction procedure.  

In this method, an orthopedic doctor will put your hips back in place by manipulating the displaced bones. Your doctor may either administer anesthesia or sedative before doing the procedure.

After that, your physician may also request an X-ray or CT scan to confirm proper alignment or see any other injuries.

Surgical Treatment

Surgical methods may only be considered if there’s a failed initial reduction or presence of fractures or loose tissues and bone fragments. Some surgical techniques commonly used involve:

  • Hip arthroscopy - a minimally invasive procedure that uses only a tiny incision to repair fractures or remove damaged tissues.
  • Open Reduction - an open surgical procedure used for complex hip dislocations.
  • Total Hip Replacement - this procedure involves removing the damaged bones and replacing them with prosthetic ones. This is only used for severe hip dislocations that reduction and other surgical procedures cannot correct.

Congenital hip displacements may be corrected using a hip brace or harness. But if not, then doctors may opt to resort to surgical means.

Get the proper treatment and care you need from the best surgeons at our Orthopedic Surgery Center Panther Creek

Our surgery center is a partnership between Raleigh Orthopaedic clinic, UNC Rex, and Panther Creek UNC health. Our mission is to be North Carolina's premier orthopedic destination by providing exceptional care that is personalized and cost-effective. 

You can trust our board-certified fellowship-trained surgeons to create an appropriate treatment plan to address your hip condition, including hip dislocation. We strive to help you recover with minimal pain to regain maximum mobility. 

Get back to your daily life pain-free! For additional information, contact our surgery center at 919-582-3050. We look forward to being your partner in care. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition. It can cause pain, numbness, and tingling down the arm into the hand. The cause? One of the hand's major nerves (the median nerve) is squeezed or compressed through the wrist. 

If left untreated, carpal tunnel syndrome usually gets worse over time. Early intervention, such as wearing a wrist splint and avoiding triggering activities, can help relieve symptoms. 

However, if the pressure on the median nerve continues, it may eventually cause nerve damage, and symptoms worsen. That is when you may require surgery to relieve pressure off the nerve. 

When Would a Doctor Recommend Carpal Tunnel Surgery

Non-surgical treatment methods are usually recommended first. These may include over-the-counter pain medications, physical therapy, splints, or steroid injections. 

Surgery may be recommended if: 

  • Non-surgical methods do not provide relief.
  • An electromyography test of the median nerve confirms that you have carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • The muscles of the hand or wrist have weakened due to the condition.
  • Symptoms have lasted six months or longer. 

What Happens During a Carpal Tunnel Release

Carpal tunnel release is often an outpatient procedure, so you will go home the same day as the surgery. There are two surgical options for carpal tunnel release: open release and endoscopic. 

Traditional Carpal Tunnel Release

With a traditional release, the surgeon cuts the wrist open. The surgeon makes about a two-inch incision on the wrist. Surgical instruments are then used to sever the carpal ligament to enlarge the carpal tunnel. 

Endoscopic Release

For an endoscopic release, the surgeon makes two small half-inch incisions. One of the incisions is on the wrist, the other on the palm. Then an endoscope is inserted into the wrist incision, which helps guide the surgeon to sever the ligament in the palm side. 

For both procedures, once the carpal ligament is released, the wounds are closed and covered with bandages or steri-strips. The hand and wrist are splinted to prevent mobilization. 

Post-operative Care Following Carpal Tunnel Surgery

Expect to spend about an hour in the recovery room after the surgery for monitoring. This allows for the anesthesia to wear off. 

Depending on your pain level, you may be given medication. Many patients do well with over-the-counter Tylenol after the surgery. 

After you recover, you will be discharged, but a friend or family member must drive you home. 

What Should I Know About Recovery and Healing?

If you have a dressing, make sure to follow provider instructions on how to change your dressing to reduce the risk of infection. You may need to wear a splint or brace for a month or more after surgery. It is also important to avoid excessive lifting or strenuous movement. 

Your surgeon will refer you to physical therapy, where you will learn exercises to improve strength and movement. Wrist extension and flexion exercises are key components to recovery. Expect to be in therapy at least a month and possibly longer for maintenance if needed. 

Make sure you keep all follow-up appointments with your provider and report any adverse symptoms you notice. You can expect a full recovery three to four weeks after your procedure. 

Concerned About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Connect with us at our Orthopedic Surgery Center Panther Creek

Our surgery center is a partnership between Raleigh Orthopaedic clinic, UNC Rex, and Panther Creek UNC health. Our mission is to be North Carolina's premier orthopedic destination by providing exceptional care that is personalized and cost-effective. 

You can trust our board-certified fellowship-trained surgeons to create an appropriate treatment plan to address your carpal tunnel syndrome condition. We strive to help you recover with minimal pain to regain maximum mobility. 

Get back to your daily life pain-free! For additional information, contact our surgery center at 919-582-3050. We look forward to being your partner in care. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Rotator cuff injuries can cause severe pain and weakness. They are caused by small tears in the tendons and tissues around the shoulder. Sometimes the injury will heal without surgical intervention, but if the damage is significant, it may be required to prevent permanent damage. 

What is a rotator cuff repair? It is often repaired arthroscopically. The surgeon will make small incisions to insert a camera called an arthroscope into the joint along with small surgical instruments. The camera allows the surgeon to visualize the joint on a television screen to help guide the repair. 

Patients can generally expect approximately four to six months before pain is reduced and movement is restored after the surgery. Patients need to know that they must restrict shoulder movement for several weeks. Physical therapy is also necessary to have the best possible outcome. 

Why do Patients Need to Have a Rotator Cuff Repair?

How does the damage happen to begin with? Usually, it is caused by the repetition of movements or a sudden injury. Rotator cuff tears can involve more than one muscle or tendon, and tears can be partial or complete. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. 

Here are some common symptoms of rotator cuff tears:

  • Pain when lifting and lowering the arm
  • Pain at rest
  • Limited range of motion
  • Weakness in the shoulder
  • A cracking sound or sensation 

The main reason patients elect surgery is due to pain and diminished mobility. Patients may try non-surgical treatments, such as rehabilitation, medications, or injections first. If these methods are ineffective, surgery is an option to repair the tear and surrounding tissues. 

Patients who have surgery find relief from these symptoms after recovery from an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. 

What are the Benefits of an Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair? 

There are several benefits to having an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair instead of open surgery. The surgery is both safe and effective. Almost all arthroscopic repairs can be completed outpatient at a surgery center. 

Benefits to arthroscopic repairs include:

  • Decreased risk of infection
  • Decreased pain
  • Less chance of damage to surrounding tissues 
  • Restored mobility
  • Less healing time

Because of these factors, patients can generally return to activities of daily living much faster with an arthroscopic procedure. 

How Can I Have a Successful Recovery after an Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair?

Expect that it will take four to six weeks for the repair to heal after surgery and up to six months for a full recovery. Arm slings are necessary for several weeks after surgery to limit mobility. Based on how the shoulder is healing, your surgeon will advise when it is no longer required. 

To have the best possible recovery, follow all aftercare instructions from your surgeon. In addition, patients need to keep follow-up appointments so the surgeon can assess healing. Patients also need to participate in physical therapy and regularly do the exercise at home as instructed. 

Why You Should Choose our Outpatient Surgery Center in Panther Creek

Orthopedic Surgery Center Panther Creek is a team of surgeons who are experts in the diagnosis and treatment across the spectrum of orthopedic injuries and disease. 

Our team consists of board-certified fellowship-trained surgeons who work with you on the best treatment plan tailored to your needs. We use cutting-edge technology at our outpatient surgery center in Cary to minimize pain and maximize mobility after your procedure. 

For additional information, contact our surgery center at 919-582-3050. We look forward to being your partner for all your orthopedic needs. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Have you experienced chronic pain in your lower back? If conservative options have failed to relieve your pain, then it may be time to discuss lumbar microdiscectomy surgery.

A lumbar discectomy is a surgery that will fix a disc in your lower back. Small incisions are used during a microdiscectomy versus an open lumbar discectomy.

In a healthy back, discs sit between each vertebra. They provide cushioning and support of the bones of the spinal column. 

With age or injury, the outer wall of spinal discs can dry out and weaken. Eventually, this causes the discs to bulge out. It may be referred to as a herniated or bulging disc. The disc can put pressure on the spinal column, which can cause pain, tingling, or weakness. 

Why Would I Need a Lumbar Microdiscectomy Surgery? 

You may need surgery to help relieve the symptoms of a bulging disc. It can help patients find relief from symptoms that come with the condition. 

Not everyone is a candidate for the surgery. Usually, conservative treatments such as physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications (N-SAIDS) are first suggested. 

If conservative methods fail, then speak with an orthopedic doctor about the risks and benefits of surgery. They can explain the difference between an open surgery versus minimally invasive surgery. 

Notably, minimally invasive surgeries are often preferred as recovery is faster and the patient experiences less pain. 

How is Minimally Invasive Surgery Performed?

There are several steps for lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. The orthopedic surgeon often performs the procedure under a local anesthetic. You will have no pain, but you will be awake. However, sometimes general anesthesia is used where you will then be asleep. 

The surgeon makes a small incision in your back with the bulging disc. They use a special x-ray to ensure they are performing the surgery in the correct location. 

The surgeon uses a wire which they insert into the vertebrae. A tube is placed over the wire, and then the surgeon pushes a second large tube over the first. The procedure will push the tissue of the vertebrae apart. 

The next step is where the surgeon puts special tools, including small surgical instruments, a camera, and a light, through the tube. The herniated disc is then removed, and the surgeon performs any necessary repairs. 

Finally, the tools and tubes are removed. A small bandage is placed over the incisions. 

How Quick is the Recovery After the Surgery?

The minimally invasive surgery is performed as an outpatient procedure. You go home the same day, a couple of hours after your surgery. You will not be able to drive, so you must have someone to take you home. 

Importantly, your orthopedic doctor’s team will give you discharge instructions on recovery. You will likely have to limit any heavy lifting or bending. The doctor will recommend you wear a back brace for a few weeks. 

Though many people can go back to work a week or so after the procedure, it is important to discuss this with your doctor. 

Also, to help in recovery, you will need physical therapy to help strengthen your back. It is important to keep all follow-up appointments with your orthopedic doctor and physical therapist for a successful recovery. 

Know that some drainage from the small incision sites is normal. If you notice an excessive amount of drainage, develop a fever, or increased pain, be sure to call your doctor.

Understand, some amount of pain is expected, even weeks after surgery. Talk to your physician about the best way to manage pain after surgery. It will eventually decrease, and you will find the pain is minimal compared to before your surgery. 

lumbar microdiscectomy surgery

You can Find Relief at our Orthopedic Surgery Center in NC

Why should you choose the Orthopedic Surgery Center of Panther Creek? To start with, we are leaders in diagnosing and treating patients with orthopedic conditions. 

Our board-certified and fellowship-trained physicians can help you recover with minimum pain, including patients who are candidates for back surgery. 

We know you want to get back to your daily life. That is why we work with our patients on a treatment plan to have a successful recovery, even after the most complicated procedures. 

Our surgeons utilize the best and most advanced surgical techniques to ensure the best possible outcomes. 

Contact us at Raleigh Orthopaedic Surgery Center of Panther Creek. We can be reached at 919-582-3050 for additional information and look forward to assisting you as your partner in care. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Arthroscopic surgery is a minimally invasive procedure used to treat diseases and injuries of the joint. The surgeon uses a small camera or scope (arthroscope) and small tools to repair the joint through tiny incisions. Since the procedure involves smaller incisions than those with open surgery, healing and recovery are generally shorter. 

Though arthroscopic surgery isn’t an option for every case where joint repair is needed, it is an appealing option for patients. Most report less pain, better healing, and fewer complications. 

arthroscopic surgery cary

Is Arthroscopic Surgery a Major Surgery? 

Arthroscopic surgery is less invasive than open surgery. It is usually done as an outpatient procedure, and patients go home on the same day. It is now a standard surgical option for many joint repairs.

The incisions made for surgery are small. The arthroscope used provides visuals of the area while the surgeon makes the repairs. The tools used are small and narrow compared to the equipment used in open surgery. Because the incisions are so small for arthroscopic surgeries, it is less complicated and offers fewer risks than major open surgery. 

What is Arthroscopic Surgery Used For? 

Surgeons can use arthroscopic surgery to treat a variety of joint conditions. The most common joint repairs include: 

  • Knee
  • Hip
  • Ankle
  • Elbow
  • Shoulder 
  • Wrist

During the surgery, physicians can repair cartilage, bones, ligaments, and tendons by removing and repairing damaged areas of the joint. 

arthroscopic surgery panther creek

How Long Does it Take to Recover From Arthroscopic Surgery? 

Recovery from arthroscopic surgery varies depending on the amount of damage to the joint and which joint is affected. 

After surgery, it is important to follow physician instructions for aftercare. To help minimize pain and inflammation, it is recommended to follow R.I.C.E. (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). 

Some patients can manage pain with over-the-counter medications such as Tylenol. When larger joints are repaired or it is an extensive surgery, the physician may prescribe opioids for a few days. 

Monitoring the wound is also essential. Often the dressing is removed the day after surgery, and steri strips are applied. Wound infections are rare but if you notice any signs or symptoms, report them to your doctor. 

Length of recovery and healing varies by procedure, but usually, within a few months, patients have a complete recovery. Participation in physical therapy and attending aftercare appointments can also help you heal and get back to everyday life. 

What is the Difference Between Arthroscopic and Laparoscopic? 

The major difference between laparoscopic surgery and arthroscopic surgery is the area of the body repaired. Laparoscopic surgery is used for gastrointestinal disease while arthroscopic is used for disease of the joints. 

Laparoscopic surgery is most often used for intestinal surgeries. These can include: 

  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Diverticulitis
  • Cancer
  • Gallbladder

It is a minimally invasive surgery where the surgeon makes small incisions called a “port.” Instruments are inserted into each port, including a camera and small instruments, similar to those used with arthroscopic surgery. 

Is an Endoscopy the Same as Arthroscopy? 

With endoscopy, a long, thin tube is inserted into the body to view an organ or tissue. It is often used to obtain an image but can also be used to complete a minor surgery. An endoscopy is minimally invasive. The scope can usually be inserted into openings such as the mouth or anus.

A physician may request an endoscopy to investigate symptoms, perform surgery, or take tissue samples (a biopsy). 

An endoscopy and arthroscopy are similar in that a camera is used to view a specific area of the body but differ in their purpose and how the procedure is performed. 

What are the Benefits of Arthroscopic Surgery? 

A significant advantage of arthroscopic surgery is less damage to the soft tissues surrounding the affected joint. Bleeding, swelling, and inflammation are minimalized, so recovery is shorter. 

After a short period of immobilization, physical therapy focusing on range of motion, strength, and flexibility helps rehabilitate the joint. Following directions from the physical therapist for home exercises are also key for optimal healing. 

By following orthopaedic follow-up instructions, patients who have arthroscopic surgery heal much faster than open surgery. 

Raleigh Orthopaedic Panther Creek Center

Orthopaedic Surgery Center of Panther Creek: Specialists in Arthroscopic Surgery and Other Orthopaedic Procedures

What can you expect at our Raleigh Orthopaedic Panther Creek Center? Our surgeons are experts in the diagnosis and treatment across the spectrum of orthopaedic procedures. 

Our board certified-fellowship trained-surgeons work with our patients on an appropriate treatment plan so you can recover with minimal pain and maximum mobility. 

We are here to help you get back to your daily life. Our orthopaedic surgery center in N.C. offers advanced surgical techniques that help to ensure the best possible outcomes for our patients.  

For additional information, contact our surgery center at 919-582-3050. We look forward to being your partner in care. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

With most surgeries, some amount of pain is expected. Some people hesitate to have surgery out of fear of a long, challenging, and painful recovery. It is important to consider that some surgeries are more difficult to recover from than others, but you will find relief from your symptoms if you can get through the recovery period. 

Some surgeries cause more pain and have a longer period of recovery than others. Spine and joint replacement surgeries are included in this category. However, every individual is different. Some people experience more pain than others. 

It is important to discuss your concerns and health history when considering surgery, including your pain tolerance. Providers at our outpatient surgery center in Cary can discuss expectations depending upon the surgery performed. 

This article will discuss orthopedic surgeries that tend to be more painful or have a more lengthy recovery period. 

1. Spinal Fusion Surgery

What is spinal fusion surgery? It is a procedure where two vertebrae are fused to prevent the movement that is causing pain. Often the surgeon will use bone grafting, taking bone from the hip, which is used to facilitate bone growth and fuse the vertebrae. 

After surgery, the recovery period can take up to six months while the vertebrae fuse to the bone graft. It is not unusual to stay at the hospital for several days after having a spinal fusion. 

2. Complex Spinal Reconstruction

Complex spinal construction involves surgery to correct and treat spinal damage. Common diagnoses include spinal stenosis and scoliosis. With these surgeries, the surgeon uses metal rods and screws to correct a curved spine or make it more stable. 

Because of the high number of nerves in the spine, recovery after the procedure can be more painful than other orthopedic surgeries. 

3. Knee Replacement

With a knee replacement, the surgeon removes damaged joints of the knee, replacing them with an artificial joint or implant. It is a common procedure but can be a painful recovery. Understand, it is major surgery, so it is essential to allow time for healing to have the best outcome possible. 

A full recovery is expected by following after-care instructions, including medication, follow-up appointments, and physical therapy. 

4. ACL Surgery

Though ACL procedures are minimally invasive, they can still cause pain. Recovery from the surgery can take up to six months. 

With ACL surgery, the surgeon may reconstruct or replace torn parts of the ACL. By allowing for a proper recovery, patients can have ideal outcomes. By allowing for time to heal, patients will see an improvement in mobility and less pain. 

5. Shoulder Replacement

The surgeon removes the damaged or diseased part of the shoulder with a shoulder replacement, replacing it with an artificial joint.

A shoulder replacement is considered major surgery and can have a lengthy recovery period. By participating in physical therapy, taking medications as prescribed, and following guidelines provided by your surgeon, you can expect to have a successful recovery. 

Are you wondering when is the right time to have a shoulder replacement? Check out our blog post and learn more about when is the right time to have a shoulder replacement.

orthopaedic surgery center cary

Have the Best Recovery Possible at our Orthopedic Surgery Center in Panther Creek

What can you expect at our orthopedic surgery center? We are leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of orthopedic procedures. You can trust our board-certified, fellowship-trained doctors to help you recover with the least amount of pain possible.

We know you want to get back to your daily life. That is why we work with our patients on a treatment plan to have a successful recovery, even after the most complicated procedures. 

Our surgeons utilize the best and most advanced surgical techniques to ensure the best possible outcomes. 

Connect with our surgery center at 919-582-3050 for additional information. We look forward to assisting you as your partner in care. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

Do you have pain and stiffness in your shoulder? You may have a frozen shoulder, also known as adhesive capsulitis. It is a condition that affects the capsule or joint lining of the shoulder. Over time, it can make the shoulder difficult to move or rotate. 

Sometimes frozen shoulders can get better on their own. Physical therapy can be helpful to learn the best exercises to help find relief and increase mobility. 

If symptoms are not relieved by conservative treatment methods, your orthopedic provider may recommend surgery. A consultation with a provider at Raleigh Orthopedic Panther Creek can help address the severity of your frozen shoulder and the best course of treatment. 

What Should I Know About Frozen Shoulder Surgery?

Surgery may be recommended if the shoulder is causing pain that continues to worsen, along with stiffness that is not relieved with time. It may be an option when symptoms have a significant impact on our daily lives. 

The goal of surgery is to stretch and release the joint capsule. This is most commonly accomplished by arthroscopic shoulder surgery. 

Shoulder Manipulation under Anesthesia 

For the surgery, you are given general anesthesia. The surgeon will move the capsule and stretch the scar tissue, releasing the tightness and improving the range of motion. 

Shoulder Arthroscopy

During shoulder arthroscopy, the doctor will cut through the tight areas of the joint capsule. The surgeon will use small instruments and a small camera inserted through incisions in the shoulder. 

Often surgeons use a combination of both procedures for the best outcome. 

What Should I Expect for Recovery After Frozen Shoulder Surgery?

Recovery time can take up to three months to heal. An arm splint is used after surgery to keep the shoulder from being stretched while healing. Physical therapy is usually started soon after surgery to help prevent new scar tissue from forming. 

There is often pain after surgery which can make you hesitant to move the shoulder. However, without mobility, the same problems that initially caused the symptoms can reoccur. 

Are There Any Complications From Frozen Shoulder Surgery?

The most common complication from frozen shoulder is ongoing or worsening of symptoms. This is caused by the formation of new scar tissue, which can make the pain and mobility symptoms reoccur. Physical therapy helps to decrease the risk of complications. 

There are other rare complications which can include infection or nerve and cartilage damage. Arthroscopic surgery procedures help to reduce these risks significantly. 

The best way to reduce any risk of complications is to follow your physical therapy plan after surgery. Early in recovery, you may see your therapist a few days per week. It is essential to keep all appointments. You will also need to do the suggested exercises several times at home as directed by your physical therapist. 

orthopedic surgical center cary

About Orthopaedic Surgery Center of Panther Creek  

Our Orthopaedic surgery center in Cary is a team of experienced physicians and staff committed to excellence. Our Board Certified doctors and fellowship-trained surgeons are experienced in diagnosing and treating a variety of orthopedic procedures, including but not limited to frozen shoulder surgery, joint replacement, knee and hips surgery, spine procedure  and more.

We individualize treatment plans, and through education, our goal is to expedite your healing so you can return to an active life. You can be assured our staff will use the best and most advanced surgical techniques for your procedure so you will have the best outcomes.

For more information, visit our website panthercreeksurgerycenter.com to learn more about our comprehensive surgery center and how we can serve your needs! 

Questions? Connect with our surgery center staff at 919-582-3050 for additional information. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

The Achilles tendon is a strong tendon that connects the muscles in your calf to your heel. The tendon helps us walk, run, and jump. Because of this, it can become injured or even tear. 

In most cases, this happens if there is a strong but sudden force. Of course athletes are at risk for an achilles tendon tear, but it can also happen to non-athletes. Usually, you would notice pain and swelling near your heel with the injury. It can also be challenging to turn your foot in a downward position. 

Sometimes surgery is necessary to repair a torn Achilles tendon. In some cases, the surgery can be a minimally invasive procedure, offering an easier recovery period for patients. Check out a video animation about achilles tendon rupture: how it can be injured, and how injuries are treated — both nonsurgically and surgically.

How Long Does Achilles Tendon Surgery Take?

Typically the surgery takes a couple of hours. During the surgery, you can usually expect the following:

  • You’ll typically receive anesthesia and a spinal block, so you do not feel anything during the repair
  • Next, the surgeon usually makes an incision through the sheath that surrounds the tendon
  • The surgeon often removes damaged tissue and repairs the tear
  • If the surgery is done using a minimally invasive technique, the incision often will be smaller, and a camera will help guide the surgeon during the repair
  • If necessary, the surgeon may remove a tendon in your foot to replace the Achilles tendon
  • After the surgeon makes all necessary repairs, the incision most likely is closed with sutures

How Long is The Recovery From Achilles Tendon Surgery?

Achilles tendon surgery can be done at our outpatient surgery center in Cary, so you can go home the same day as the surgery. The calf is usually put in a splint to help you to keep from moving. You will likely have pain for several days after the surgery, so be sure to take pain medications as prescribed. 

You should allow yourself time to rest and keep your leg elevated as much as possible. You will also be given crutches to help you with mobility. 

If you notice extreme pain that is getting worse and not better, or if you notice any sign of infection, be sure to tell your doctor as soon as possible. 

Approximately 2 weeks after the surgery you will see your provider to have the sutures removed. The splint may then be removed and replaced with an orthopedic boot. At this time, you can discuss when you might be able to do some weight-bearing. Starting physical therapy is also discussed at this time.

outpatient surgery center in Cary

Understand, it can be a long recovery. Return to normal activity may not be possible until about 10 weeks after surgery. Competitive sports may need to be delayed for three to six months. 

Is it Difficult to Sleep After Achilles Tendon Surgery? 

It can be difficult to sleep after your surgery. It is important to put pillows under your leg to keep it elevated. Taking your prescribed pain medication can also help reduce the pain so that you can sleep. 

We Can Help You at Raleigh Orthopaedic in Panther Creek

If you have just injured your Achilles tendon, then contact us at The Orthopaedic Surgery Center of Panther Creek. We will assess your injury and develop a treatment plan. 

Our outpatient surgery center in Cary is a team of the Board Certified doctors and fellowship-trained surgeons who are experienced in diagnosing and treating a variety of orthopedic procedures, including achilles tendon rupture.

You can be assured our staff will use the best and most advanced surgical techniques for your procedure so you will have the best outcomes.

Our goal is to expedite your safe return to a healthy, active, and productive lifestyle through individualized treatment and education. So let us help take care of you! Questions? Do not hesitate to contact us, and we look forward to being a partner in your care. 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.

outpatient orthopedic surgery cary
6715 McCrimmon Parkway
Suite 205 A 
Cary, NC 27519
Monday – Friday: 6:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
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